Tell Us How You Are
Taking People With You

Do you have a great story to share as a result of the lessons of Taking People With You? Share it here.

Take a Look at Some of the Submitted Stories Below:

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Roger M.

I can confidently say that the TPWY course has had a huge impact on my career and in my life!

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Roger M.

I can confidently say that the TPWY course has had a huge impact on my career and in my life!

David, teaching others your valuable lessons by sharing your failures as well as your successes has been the most inspiring learning I have experienced in the company. Hearing from your experiences directly; re-living your failures was shocking and I could not believe you were so honest and as I see now… humble.

I can remember very clearly repeating the Crystal Pepsi story with my wife that night after the class. I couldn't believe what I was hearing from the infallible (which was my mindset at the time regarding leadership) leader and CEO of our company. It literally changed the way I began to think about my own career. I immediately wanted to be bolder in my leadership! To stand-up and take a chance to make a difference! A difference that mattered to the business and to our customers! It made being a leader, especially at YUM Human vs Superhuman. It also confirmed that I could do it in my own way with my own style – even with a Go-TEE. I uncovered these two important insights that allowed me to have more confidence to take the risks required to succeed and the courage to face the potential of failure.

George W.

I liked the Be Yourself/Know Yourself module. We all have to stay true to who and what we are to a certain extent to "be real" and "genuine". People will find it easier to follow you when carry yourself in this manner. In turn, you'll be happier and you'll achieve your best results.

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George W.

I liked the Be Yourself/Know Yourself module. We all have to stay true to who and what we are to a certain extent to "be real" and "genuine". People will find it easier to follow you when carry yourself in this manner. In turn, you'll be happier and you'll achieve your best results.

When creating a TPWY plan, I think the key is to be both tactical and strategic with tasks and people. You have to be tactical and detailed enough to map out a plan to get from A to Z-- including what to do and who to align with. At the same time, you've got to be able to roll it up into main categories and big buckets of activity so that you can talk about it with people in fairly simple terms—so they can get their head wrapped around it easily and quickly.

Anne L.

TPWY is surely one of the most important learning lessons. Thank you David! Many best practices and experiences from top...

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Anne L.

TPWY is surely one of the most important learning lessons. Thank you David! Many best practices and experiences from top leaders from different industries give us ideas in many aspects. The pre-course reading of the president Truman reminds us the power of intentionality that enabled him to gain a breakthrough result even though he faced challenging circumstances. Truman wins the election, which was viewed as "mission impossible". I am very impressed by this history. I am delighted when I know this course will be cascaded to the level of restaurant general managers who are the No. 1 leaders in our company. Once they are empowering others, we will have thousands of "Trumans" in our team!

Be Yourself…

Micky P.

Every time a KFC Australia executive visits a KFC, he or she invariably completes a few standard actions:

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Micky P.

Every time a KFC Australia executive visits a KFC, he or she invariably completes a few standard actions: (a) they always will be in logo wear (b) they pick up any trash at the entrance of the store and put in a bin (c) they clean up any trash on tables (d) they always talk to customers in the store and start by asking about the quality of the food (e) they always carry recognition cards and pins and do on-the-spot recognition for staff (f) if they are short staffed at the back-of-house, they will not hesitate to pitch in, if only to clear up.

You’ve Got to Believe…

Jonathan B.

When we were challenged to find a higher order for Yum! in celebration of our 10th anniversary, we decided to create the world's largest private sector hunger relief effort. With five brands and an 80 percent franchised system in 117 countries...

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Jonathan B.

When we were challenged to find a higher order for Yum! in celebration of our 10th anniversary, we decided to create the world's largest private sector hunger relief effort. With five brands and an 80 percent franchised system in 117 countries, there were a lot of obstacles. However, we recognized that the good we could do was far greater than any bump in the road along the way.

We believed in this and saw ourselves succeeding. We constantly told ourselves that the problems we were encountering to launch this program paled in comparison to the problem of people starving in remote corners of the world. We had intentionality, take the hill teamwork, and went for breakthrough. In the last five years, World Hunger Relief has raised nearly $115 million for the United Nations World Food Programme and other organizations, providing approximately 460 million meals that have helped save millions of lives. Our global initiative has indeed become the world's largest private sector hunger relief effort.

Tony L.

"Taking People With You" was a watershed in my business career. Previously as a leader, I was constantly having to invent...

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Tony L.

"Taking People With You" was a watershed in my business career. Previously as a leader, I was constantly having to invent techniques and "tricks" to help drive the agenda and lead the team forward. Besides opening my eyes to an incredibly well-structured leadership approach and to a smorgasbord of techniques, TPWY gave massive credibility and license to some of the tools which I had perceived as being "crutches" or "superficial aids" to the leadership role. Recognition, admitting not knowing the answers, really listening, defining reality and using How We Win Together principles all became powerful components of my leadership repertoire – and created a step-change in my capacity as a leader within Yum!.

Pat G.

As a young Finance Director at my previous employer, I had a painful first-hand example of what happens when you don't "Gain Alignment Every Step of the Way." I was tasked with responsibility for developing an activity-based costing system to establish division-level accountability for corporate-level costs. This was a high-profile project and a golden opportunity for a young leader to have a real impact on the organization.

I led my team to analyze cost drivers and design cost-recovery mechanisms, with the goal of producing a system that was so scientifically engineered that no one could dispute its accuracy. After about six months of very intensive development and testing, we implemented the system which worked seamlessly. There was one problem: some of my counterparts rejected the system because they hadn't been consulted during the design, development and testing phases. It took a few months to back up and...

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Pat G.

As a young Finance Director at my previous employer, I had a painful first-hand example of what happens when you don't "Gain Alignment Every Step of the Way." I was tasked with responsibility for developing an activity-based costing system to establish division-level accountability for corporate-level costs. This was a high-profile project and a golden opportunity for a young leader to have a real impact on the organization.

I led my team to analyze cost drivers and design cost-recovery mechanisms, with the goal of producing a system that was so scientifically engineered that no one could dispute its accuracy. After about six months of very intensive development and testing, we implemented the system which worked seamlessly. There was one problem: some of my counterparts rejected the system because they hadn't been consulted during the design, development and testing phases. It took a few months to back up and "gain alignment every step of the way" before we could effectively roll-out the system.

We ended up not making any changes to the original design, but we lost a lot of time and my team was demoralized. I also learned a very important and obvious lesson: To effect change, you need to involve not just your immediate team and your sponsors, but your extended team as well by building relationships with them, gaining their commitment, and keeping them informed...every step of the way.

Jim M.

I got the opportunity to be a Project Leader for a new group. I was not used to being the "subject matter expert" in the particular function I was working. Looking back now, one of the biggest lessons I learned was that I didn't "know everything" nor would I ever know everything. The key was to leverage the people who did have the functional know-how and lead them to pull those jigsaw pieces together into the overall dream/vision.

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Jim M.

I got the opportunity to be a Project Leader for a new group. I was not used to being the "subject matter expert" in the particular function I was working. Looking back now, one of the biggest lessons I learned was that I didn't "know everything" nor would I ever know everything. The key was to leverage the people who did have the functional know-how and lead them to pull those jigsaw pieces together into the overall dream/vision.

Through the project, I continued to challenge each team member's know-how to both build my own understanding as well as help them determine if there was a more efficient and/or effective method to drive our end result. We would do this through daily (sometimes hourly) "Jeep Bonnet" meetings. We learned a ton around how all pieces must work together to maximize efficiency and minimize errors.

Through this process, the team grew both its understanding of their own roles as well as built cross-brand and functional know-how due to their crisis-like collaboration and common vision.

Unleash the Power of People

Nishat G.

My biggest "revelation" or take-away from the TPWY course was this: it is not enough to have an Step Change or Breakthrough...

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Nishat G.

My biggest "revelation" or take-away from the TPWY course was this: it is not enough to have an Step Change or Breakthrough plan without giving deep consideration to:

(1) Identifying Who you need to take with you – this includes the senior team, your team, the team/function/market who's help you need and of course, the ultimate beneficiaries

(2)Depending on the audience, How you are going to approach / frame your discussion to get alignment, ie "solve together" versus "sell"

My experience has been that any idea, project or opportunity, no matter how compelling it may be, will fail without these two critical elements.

Jens H.

For me, TPWY was the start of a very intense personal journey from Manager to Leader. Whereas most previous steps in my...

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Jens H.

For me, TPWY was the start of a very intense personal journey from Manager to Leader. Whereas most previous steps in my career had been about acquiring new skills and accumulating experience, this was much more about a re-appraisal of myself and how I relate to others. Re-appraising and understanding your own value system and behaviors is painful at times. It involves acknowledging and accepting your strengths and weaknesses and building on this self-awareness to relate to others in a much more authentic and natural way. Knowing and accepting "who you are" opens the door to developing true empathy and to becoming a leader who gets the very best out of their team.

Mark C.

I've always believed that, given the same opportunities, my team members would do a better job than me. I always share whatever...

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Mark C.

I've always believed that, given the same opportunities, my team members would do a better job than me. I always share whatever insights and know-how I learn from various occasions with my team in a timely manner. I also find that sharing mistakes helps people from repeating them. Whenever possible, I strongly encourage my team to share any real-life examples to ensure more efficient and effective alignment among team members.

As you can imagine, in the beginning it was very difficult to persuade my team members to share their mistakes. I started with myself, and focused on creating an encouraging environment with positive energy. I finally convinced the team when they realized the power of sharing such stories and best-practices from time to time. Now it has become a part of my team's culture.

Steve E.

The single largest insight for me from TPWY is the very first: Be Your Best Self.

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Steve E.

The single largest insight for me from TPWY is the very first: Be Your Best Self.

The examples shown in class of people not following this insight clearly display how you can come across as not being genuine if you are not true to yourself. It is extremely important if you want to lead and influence people you first need the mindset of the leader and that starts with Being Your Best Self. In many situations in my career I have found people (including myself) trying to conform to the style of the surrounding group. Reflecting back on those situations I now realize that I was not an effective leader when attempting to mold myself into someone that I thought the people around me wanted me to be.

Keith W.

The quote "Alignment is not equal to Agreement – sniff out the conflict" is stuck to my computer monitor. I think in the past there has been...

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Keith W.

The quote "Alignment is not equal to Agreement – sniff out the conflict" is stuck to my computer monitor. I think in the past there has been too much focus on getting all our stakeholders to agree with a course of action and became very hard to get things done.

Taking People With You gave me license and conviction to lead. I felt comfortable that after listening carefully, we could get alignment (not agreement necessarily) around a course of action and then execute. Our most critical audiences also now clearly know they can all contact us with any views and opinions at any time outside of the formal meeting processes and we will listen. They, however, also know that once a decision has been made we will all execute against it.

Gain Alignment Every Step of the Way

Martin H.

I always believed that I was good at my job and that I knew what a leader looked like or how they behaved. TPWY really changed my perspective. It made me completely rethink the perception I had of myself and forced me to take a long hard look at my leadership...

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Martin H.

I always believed that I was good at my job and that I knew what a leader looked like or how they behaved. TPWY really changed my perspective. It made me completely rethink the perception I had of myself and forced me to take a long hard look at my leadership "qualities." Odds are the perception that people have of you remains inconsistent with the perception you have of yourself. I was never open to this level of scrutiny prior to the course.

  • Respect before friendships: I got comfortable with the idea that I needed to be brutally honest with myself and others, crystal clear with my expectations and consistent in my actions. I had to stop focusing on wanting people to "like" me.
  • My job is to find, grow my replacement: This is a leap of faith. You have to believe that your actions should always be directed at making your team great and at some point you will have to move up…or on. And your team has to know and feel it. That's the best way to earn their trust.